Thornbury Township Sewer Committee - Home

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Boards & Minutes > Sewer Advisory Committee

Thornbury Township Sewer Committee

The Sewer Committee meets on the fourth Thursday of each month at 7:00 pm.

Contact:          Deb Zitarelli, Secretary

Chairman:      Ted Jacquet

Vice Chair:     Scott Raimondo

Members:      George Morley
                         Jack Howley

Members:      Jim O'Brien
Members:     


Spring 2017 Update

The change in season is always a great time to perform maintenance and inspections of your sewer and septic systems. Spring is no exception. Septic and grinder pump systems need to be monitored to ensure that they work properly throughout their service lives. When these systems are properly maintained and operated, they effectively reduce or eliminate most human health or environmental threats posed by pollutants in household wastewater. Avoid allowing strong chemicals, oils, diapers, plastics etc. from entering your onsite x`and pump systems. Before an issue arises due to harsh temperatures, it may be best to contact your service providers about any recommended preventative maintenance or back-up devices that may be available. For those with E/One grinder pumps, we suggest checking out www.eone.com for monitoring and maintenance information or calling an authorized service representative. Site Specific Design is listed as the service provider for Eastern Pennsylvania. Their number is (800)295-8853. Please be sure to limit your water usage as much as possible if you are on grinder pump system and there’s a power outage. The tank does have storage capacity but it is only adequate for the short term. E/One suggests using an alarm panel with a Remote Sentry Module and generator receptacle. The Remote Sentry Module runs on battery so it can alert you to high tank levels when the power is out. If you haven’t taken advantage of the infrastructure already in place in the sewer districts, it may be a good time to revisit this decision. The Sewer Committee is an advisory committee that wants to serve the needs of the residents of Thornbury Township. We invite residents to attend our meetings if they are interested in public sewer for their homes or if they have any other sewer or onsite system inquiries.


 

The Sewer Committee is an advisory committee that wants to serve the needs of the residents of Thornbury Township. We invite residents to attend our meetings if they are interested in public sewer for their homes or if they have any other sewer or onsite system inquiries.


SEWAGE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (SMP)

Septic systems, also called on-lot systems, are really sewage systems that treat and dispose of domestic sewage through natural processes. Liquid wastes from a treatment tank percolate through soils where it then becomes neutralized and further broken down. In contrast to a centralized system which collects and treats sewage from multiple homes and disposes of the sewage off-site, septic system operation and maintenance remains the responsibility of the homeowner.

These on-lot systems have, in the past, been labeled as interim which often gave the illusion that eventually they would be replaced with public sewers.  While in operation on-lot systems require specific operation and maintenance requirements which if not met, the system will either fail completely or function well below its capabilities. In either case, public health hazards or pollution problems will be the result. When public health hazards or pollution problems occur, the municipal government is legally responsible to find solutions.

Pennsylvania Sewage Facilities regulations, under Act 537, includes provisions for establishing legal, administrative and financial mechanisms for long term operation and maintenance of  municipal sewage including on-lot sewage disposal systems or privately owned treatment facilities.

Today, many present and proposed Township ordinances provide for the regulation, inspection, maintenance and rehabilitation of on-lot sewage disposal systems and establish penalties and appeal procedures necessary for the proper administration of a sewage management program.  Most Sewer Management Programs currently operating in Pennsylvania require the regular pumping of on-lot treatment tanks once every three years. or whenever an inspection program reveals that the treatment tank is filled with solids or scum in excess of 1/3 of the liquid depth of the tank. Requirements may also include holding tank maintenance and disposal.